Interesting Things About… Returning to Our Roots

 

Digital technology is increasingly being perceived as toxic, with the potential to corrupt the purity of our minds and souls. According to recent OFCOM research, 15m of us undertook a ‘digital detox’ last year, owing weight to a growing anti-digital movement. Recently we’ve seen a novel manifestation of this ‘digital detox’ movement: a romanticising of the time of Genesis. A time encapsulated by naïve innocence, raw foods, and tools without push notifications. Here are three of the favourite examples we’ve seen:

 

1

Eden on Channel 4

Directly referencing the Biblical utopia, Eden sees twenty young people stranded in a remote corner of Scotland. Tasked with building a society from scratch, Eden’s inhabitants all talk of wanting to forgo their high pressure jobs and always-connected lives in pursuit of a more primal existence. They build their shelters and grow (or kill) their food. Despite the physical hardship, the Adams and Eves constantly remind the audience about how the experience is distilling the human condition down to its purest form.

 

2

The Bunyadi

When London’s first nudist restaurant opened at the start of summer, it was tempting to damn it with faint praise as a Time Out enthusiast’s latest novelty haunt. Diners leave everything in lockers: servers wear tactically placed fig leaves. People are encouraged not to feel abashed: embarrassment is a modern day affliction. A feeling of liberation certainly follows the initial shock. Once modern clothes and gadgets are removed, we are reduced to a state no different from God’s garden.

 

3

London Foraging Courses

These courses have proved highly popular over the last couple of years, with people coming from far and wide to learn what it takes to forage successfully. The course covers over 20 wild food plants and provides tips on how to identify, cook and prepare them.

 

Why is this interesting?

At the same time as many brands race to become further integrated with our digital lives, more people are jumping on to the digital detox movement. We think some brands can build meaningful relationships with people based on anti-digital positions as a growing desire for ‘purer’ non-digital experiences begins to become an aspiration.

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